High Plume Dilution Fans | Seven Clicks From Your Best Selection

We have been working with high plume dilution fans since their inception (over 25 years ago).  It’s absolutely amazing what we see on some schedules these days.   For the most part,  they will work in the design.  Problem is that in many cases they are not optimized for the right variables.  There are at least 7 variables that should be considered.  These are never weighted the same but should all be thought through carefully to yield the best fan selection.

Seven Clicks From Your Best Selection

  1. First Cost:  In some projects this drives the selection;  budget is everything.  We are called on to select the least expensive solution that will meet performance at least cost.  This is important information to know right up front.
  2. Operating Costs:  There are times when facility owners are driven to create the most sustainable designs.  There are trade-offs to be made but selecting for life cycle costs is very common now.
  3. Energy Recovery:  We are seeing energy recovery included in a significant number of our designs.  Look at the application and determine a payback for the type of energy recovery that is being considered.   It does not make sense to use energy recovery on applications that do not support a payback (like very small applications or applications with extremely dangerous exhaust).  Most of the applications we see with High Plume Dilution Fans do support a payback and it’s usually less than 4 to 5 years.
  4. Redundancy:  Most High Plume Dilution Fan Systems (Lab Fume Hood Exhaust Fan Systems) are now manifolded systems. For these systems it is essential to figure out how much, if any, redundancy is required. We build redundancy into systems as a backup. Typically we look to make sure we are covered in the event of a fan failure. If one fan fails, will the system be able to cover the exhaust load? The tradeoff is cost. Redundancy costs money. It’s important to determine the correct amount of redundancy to match the budget.
  5. Footprint:  These types of systems can take up a lot of space,  especially if energy recovery is being used.  If footprint is an issue then systems can be designed differently to accommodate.
  6. Sound Attenuation:  It is important to look at the type of application and the proximity to neighbors. If it’s a big industrial park and the building is miles from neighbors then we don’t look to incorporate sound attenuation. If the building is on a quiet campus and could impact other areas then it’s definitely considered.
  7. Effective Stack Height:  High Plume Dilution Fan Systems are often the fan of choice to solve a specific problem;  like getting lab exhaust fumes, odors or smoke away from the roof level.   In many cases it is important to maximize the height of the discharge plume.  Great to know this information in the start of design.

Strobic Diesel FanWe have tried to make this easy for designers.  We have captured these questions on a very simple form:   7 clicks away from your best selection

Just fill out the form and we will turn it around for you in less than 24 hours. We will also make sure to have senior people here at DAC Sales review the selection. Experience makes for a better selection.

Visit our Strobic Toolbox for other cool applications.

 Related Blog Posts: 
High Plume Dilution Fans | What is a High Plume Dilution Fan?
High Plume Dilution Fans | 3 Key Design Questions
Lab Exhaust Fans | What Standards to reference for Lab Exhaust Fan design?

For More Information - askRick
High Plume Dilution Fans | What is a High Plume Dilution Fan? – See more at: http://www.dac-hvac.com/category/high-plume-dilution-fans/page/2/#sthash.kxsqa5yF.dpuf
High Plume Dilution Fans | What is a High Plume Dilution Fan? – See more at: http://www.dac-hvac.com/category/high-plume-dilution-fans/page/2/#sthash.kxsqa5yF.dpuf

 

 

 

 

 

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